26 Oct
A message from the Gyre

main1255623558
all images by Chris Jordan

I’ve been completely captivated by Chris Jordan’s work since discovering his apocalyptic, Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption project. This picture of cell phones. Or this one of cell phone chargers. Or this one of Crushed Cars. Wow, what a comment consumerism’s magnetic charm. It’s like catnip to humans. If the photos I just linked to doesn’t make you stop and think about the harm we’re doing this planet, peep his other series titled Running With Numbers, which has also been turned into a book. If that doesn’t illuminate the delimma, I’m not sure anything will connect the dots for you. A little bit of death, perhaps? Midway, Jordan’s latest project hits me the same unforgettable way. I saw the images before I read about the project and thought I was looking at set up shots of dead birds tied into a bigger message. I was so wrong.

“These photographs of albatross chicks were made just a few weeks ago on Midway Atoll, a tiny stretch of sand and coral near the middle of the North Pacific. The nesting babies are fed bellies-full of plastic by their parents, who soar out over the vast polluted ocean collecting what looks to them like food to bring back to their young. On this diet of human trash, every year tens of thousands of albatross chicks die on Midway from starvation, toxicity, and choking.

To document this phenomenon as faithfully as possible, not a single piece of plastic in any of these photographs was moved, placed, manipulated, arranged, or altered in any way. These images depict the actual stomach contents of baby birds in one of the world’s most remote marine sanctuaries, more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent.” – Chris Jordan.

Chris has a few current and upcoming shows. The two current shows at the moment: “Message in a Bottle” show currently on display at The Mariners’ Museum, Newport News, VA, until December 30; and “Rummaging in the Rubbish: Waste and Recycling in Contemporary Art” at Koldo Mitxelena Cultural Centre, San Sebastian, until Jan 23. From Nov 7 to Dec. 11, “What’s the Rush? Topics on Convenience” will be at California State University Fullerton Main Art Gallery. Check his site for more info.

no images were found

no images were found

no images were found

final note: Lost In A Supermarket can mean many things to many people (it does to me), but one thing it definitely is: a living comment on western consumerism. And for that Chris Jordan is a hero in my eyes.

10 Responses to “Midway by Chris Jordan”

  1. Hypnotice says:

    Of golf course, what a fantastic web site and instructive posts, I’ll increase backlink – bookmark this websites? Regards.

  2. EMT Jobs says:

    Hello…

    DropshipDragon provides dropping for quality, affordable products direct from China to your customers. Perfect for eBay sellers and website owners alike!…

  3. Great blog…

    The next time I read a blog, I hope that it doesnt disappoint me as much as this one. I mean, I know it was my choice to read, but I actually thought youd have something interesting to say. All I hear is a bunch of whining about something that you coul…

  4. hello…

    you have a great blog here! would you like to make some invite posts on my blog?…

  5. Hey…

    very nice post, i certainly love this website, keep on it…

  6. Arigatou…

    Hello! I just would like to give a huge thumbs up for the great info you have here on this post. I will be coming back to your blog for more soon….

  7. Hi…

    It’s hard to find knowledgeable people on this topic, but you sound like you know what youfre talking about! Thanks…

  8. Hey…

    very nice post, i certainly love this website, keep on it…

  9. hello…

    you have a great blog here! would you like to make some invite posts on my blog?…

  10. […] covered Seattle-based photographer Chris Jordan’s Midway photography project back in 2009, and its impact was undeniable. Since that time, Jordan and a film crew have spent the […]

Leave a Reply